ANT-2, A.N.Tupolev

40k by Paul Nann (see his Great Collection!); Photo (21k) by John Sloan (JohnS426@aol.com) from Alexej Gretchihine R.A.P.
ANT-2 is on display at Monino Air Force Museum near Moscow;
T
he first Soviet all-metal aircraft. It was built as a technology test platform. Pilot's open cockpit was located right behind the engine, above the wing leading edge. Two passengers were seated face-to-face in narrow toll fuselage of triangular section. Project started in May 1923.
Fuselage and wing frame was assembled of domestic aluminum alloy ('Kolchugaluminij') profiles. Skin - corrugated kolchugaluminij. Ailerons and elevators had rigid controls, rudder - wire controls.
Construction was very light, new design team (including A.I.Putilov, V.M.Petlyakov, I.I.Pogosskij, E.I.Pogosskij, N.S.Nekrasov, B.M.Kondorskij, A.I.Zimin et al) proved to be a serious competitor for Junkers (who dominated market of metal aircraft at the time).
First flight took place on May 26, 1923 (engineer N.I.Petrov). The only modification required was done quickly - slightly increase of the tailfin. Official acceptance trials in presence of deputies from UVVS and TsAGI - May 28, 1923.
There were still no domestic 100hp engine available, and passenger capacity was too small for mass use. ANT-2 remained a technology demonstrator, but first step to all metal monoplane concept was made.
PredecessorsModifications
-
ANT-3 R-3
16k b/w ANT-2 drawing from "History of aircraft construction in the USSR" by V.B.Shavrov, Vol.1 p.364;
Used for background on this page.
Technical data
Type ANT-2
Function Passenger
Technology demonstrator
Year 1923
Crew 1
Engines 1*100hp Bristol-Lucifer
Length 7.50m
Wingspan 10.0m
Wing area 17.5m2
Empty weight 523kg
Loaded weight 836kg
Wing load 47.5kg/m2
Power load 8.36kg/hp
Speed at 0m170km/h
Speed at 3000m 155km/h
Landing Speed 78km/h
Landing Roll 6sec
Takeoff Roll 8sec
Range 425km
Flight Endurance 2.5hmin
Ceiling 3300m
Climb
1000m 8.5min
2000m 21.5min
3000m 48.0min
Payload
Seats 2
Created November 13, 1996
Modified August 28, 1998
by Alexandre Savine;
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